Cathy's Crochet Corner

Posts Tagged ‘postaweek

I shared on my main blog that I made a blanket for baby Michael.

I was traveling on business when I started it.

I didn’t want to worry about patterns.

That said, I still had multiple skeins going during my travel.

Here are all my supplies and a the blanket in progress in the pocket of an airline seat!

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I’ve made many baby blankets in pastel colors. 

This time I wanted bold colors, something that would be a change of pace.

I had skeins of solid navy blue and gray yarn in my stash.  I debated about a blanket in blue and gray only, but I had recently made a king-size blanket in these colors.

I wanted to be sure this blanket was different!

To decide the colors I took the blue and navy skeins with me to the store. 

I finally saw a brick red that I felt balanced out the combination. 

Strong, but not overdone. 

Yes!  The colors were settled!

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The blanket measures about 36 inches square.

The gray sections are half-double crochet.  That’s it! 

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The blue and red sections use a variation of a shell pattern.

The shell pattern is made of two double crochets and one single crochet.

You skip two stitches between each shell.

When the shell is made this way, a couple of things happen. The shell leans to the side. It also “pops out” just a little bit.

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When you make additional rows, the first shell is made by making a chain three, double, then single crochet.

Other than that the shell pattern continues!

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Most patterns call for three stitches in the corners. 

I generally crochet four stitches in a corner. 

It seems to make the corners lie flat, whereas three stitches might curl.

For this edging I decided to keep it simple; just rows of single crochet.

This way the stripes would be the focal point!

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I used approximately one skein per color.

Pretty easy to make..a variation in the pattern to add some texture…three alternating colors for some visual interest…

A little blanket for a little guy!

Happy Crocheting!

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As I mentioned in my main blog, my Aunt Sheila sent me a box of yarn!

In addition to a thank-you note, I decided to also send her a scarf!

It works up very quickly.

If you know how to make a double and a single crochet, then you’ll be able to make this scarf!

Please note, I am using the standard naming conventions used in the United States.  In Europe and other parts other world the naming convention may be different!

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I used a lightweight 3-ply yarn and a size G/6, or 4.25mm hook.

The first row is all double crochet.

The general pattern in the second row is to skip one stitch, then crochet a double in the next four stitches. 

For the fifth stitch, yarn-over, just like a double crochet, then reaching backward to the first double, place the hook behind it (where you skipped one).  You pick up the yarn from the back, then pull the yarn to the front and through the loops on the hook, also like a double crochet.

The yarn will wrap around the other four stitches.

Huh?

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This is the “reverse”side of the scarf. If you look at one set of stitches you can see that one stitch wraps around the other four. 

It does not hook into the base of the next stitch!

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The next few rows alternate all doubles, or the pattern.

For this scarf there are seven rows , four all double and three of the pattern.

When you have a simple pattern like this, the alternating rows can allow the pattern to become distinct, even though the yarn is variegated.

The border is a row consisting of a basic single crochet, chain one repeat, followed by a row of all singles.

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That’s it!

Easy – Easy – Easy!

In case you’re wondering how I chose the crochet hook, there is a simple way to get some guidance on that, too!

The label on the skein of yarn provides washing instructions and other information including the recommended size for crochet hooks or knitting needles.

Since I don’t typically use this weight of yarn I just went with the recommended size. If you crochet a swatch or other small amount you can then decided if you want to change the size of the hook.

Did I say it was easy?  Oh, yeah – I did!

Stay tuned!  In a later post I’ll share what I  made with the yarn my aunt sent to me!

Happy Crocheting!